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 Left: AFM height image of gold electrodes on silicon substrate performed with Multiview 4000TM using Tuning Fork intermittent feedback.

Right: Electrical image shows current conductivity on the gold electrodes. The non- continuity points are due to dust accumulated on the surface. 

  

Performed with Nanonics unique ultrastable Nano-wire glass insulated electrical probe

 

  • Ultrastable solid wire electrical probes q Ultra-Sensitive Tuning Fork  Normal Force feedback
  • Geometrical friendly for online multiprobe all under active AFM feedback.
  • Low contact resistance and full insulation with glass upto the probe tip for high electro-potential resolution
  • Glass coating insulation can be overcoated with metal to emulate coax geometries for ultrahigh sensitivity electrical imaging
  • High cantilever design that minimizes cantilever electrical interference
Thursday, 28 February 2013 10:01

Au etched groove on silicon

 
 
Left: AFM Height image of an etched groove of Au surface on Silicon substrate performed with two probe system.

Right: Electrical conductivity image performed with one a scanned probe while a second SPM probe is used to provide a nanometric local bias electrode.

 
Thursday, 28 February 2013 09:56

Protein Writing on Si Surface

 

BSA protein writing on Si surface using the Fountain Pen Nanolithography technique. On the left is an AFM image presenting two lines of the BSA. The plot on the right shows a height line profile of these lines. A pipette of 100nm aperture has been used with contact mode of 20µm /ms writing speed.

WSxM software has been used for image processing of the pictures above: I. Horcas et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78, 013705 (2007). 
 

A silicon surface has been selected for writing due to its significance in the semiconductor industry. Using FPN for patterning on silicon could open the door for this technique to be integrated into different fields of semiconductors and materials.

Patterning with biological materials on silicon demonstrates the ability of FPN in biochip technology. FPN allows for patterning with biological materials onto Si surfaces, commonly used in integrated circuits and semiconductor devices.

Ideal systems for this application:

MV4000
MV2000
MV1000

 

Thursday, 28 February 2013 09:50

Protein Nanoprinting

 
     
 40 x 40 micron Topgraphy  

3D image

 

 

   
 
60 x 80 micron optical image of the same region.
 
 
Video of protein printing in real time
     

  
Only Nanonics can deliver chemicals or gas onto the sample on line, with no need to remove the tip from the sample.

Protein printing is made possible by the Nanonics Chemical Delivery System and Nanopipette

Using any of the Nanonics MultiView systems, chemicals, in liquid or gas form, can be fed into the pipette via a silicon tube. Apart from Protein Printing, applications of this setup include metallic nano-etching and nanolithography: an etchant can be introduced into the sample and scanned across it with nanometer precision using our 3D FlatScanning™ technology. The nanopipette is engaged by the sample using standard contact-mode atomic force microscopy, and our integrated system makes it possible to view the etching simultaneously through any optical microscope.


 

    Nanofountain Pen reviewed by Nature Materials

In the August 2003 edition of Nature Materials. The Nanofountain Pen was reviewed in the Material Update section.

Click to open application note on the uses of the nanofountain pen (331kB)

Thursday, 28 February 2013 09:48

AFM Imaging of TMP

 

X: 3.0 μm

 

X: 3.0 μm

 

Thursday, 28 February 2013 09:43

AFM Image of Tip

Standard Silicon Tip 
Imaged by an Optical Fiber AFM Probe

   
 
2D AFM image of the tip area approximately 15µm x 15µm
     
3D Topographic Image of standard Silicon tip measured by AFM in the intermittent contact mode of operation  
 
These images were produced by the Nanonics MultiView 1000™ with an optical fiber probe in the intermittent contact mode. 

Only the Nanonics optical fiber AFM probes have high enough aspect ratios (10:1) and are narrow enough to image the structure of a standard Silicon Probe.
 
 
Cantilevered AFM Probe: note that the angle of the cantilever enables viewing the sample underneath the AFM tip
 
 
Sketch of  AFM Probe
Thursday, 28 February 2013 09:38

Silicon NanoIndentation

 

 

Figure 1: NanoIndentation obtained on SiO2 thin layer in Si obtained with 50nm Berkovich Diamond tip.

A) AFM topographic image of a nanoindentation obtained with a load of 100µN.

B) Line profile crossing the nanoindentation areas shows a depth of 36.5nm.

 

C) AFM topographic image of a nanoindentation obtained with a load of 50 µN.

D) Line profile crossing the nanoindentation areas shows a depth of 15.08nm.

WSxM software has been used for image processing of the pictures above: I. Horcas et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78, 013705 (2007)

Thursday, 28 February 2013 09:33

FIB Trench

 

  

 

 

 

 

Figure 1:
A)
 CCD picture of FIB Etched Trenches.
B) CCD picture shows Nanonics’ AFM glass probe during AFM scan of deep trench structure shown in (A).

 

 
 

 


 

Figure 2:
A) 
AFM 3D (60x60 microns) presentation of the FIB etched feature shows a deep trench imaged with AFM Nanonics’ glass probe.
B) 2D AFM image show a line crossing the trench for line profiling.
C) Topography line profile (presented in B) showing large Z height of ~30 microns.

  • The above AFM image was obtained with the MultiView 1000TM SPM head.
  • Nanonics' 3D Flat ScanTM stage allows for unprecedented large Z scans of up to 100 microns.
  • Nanonics' unique glass probes with high aspect ratios and normal force sensing allows for scanning such complicated topographies.

WSxM software has been used for image processing of the pictures above: I. Horcas et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78, 013705 (2007)

 
Thursday, 28 February 2013 09:16

Electrical

Dual Probe Electrical Measurements

Multiview 4000TM allows for unique online multiprobe electrical measurements through it’s accurate/nanometric manipulation and imaging capabilities. Up to four online probes are readily used with flexible positioning and nanomanipulation for localized providing bias, I-V localized measurements and multichannel imaging. The pictures above show a two probe electrical imaging of grooved Au coated surface on glass. One probe was used to bias the surface and a second probe for AFM/Electrical imaging.

Nanonics' ultrastable solid wire electrical probes allow for low contact resistance of a few tens of ohms and full insulation with glass up to the probe tip for high electro-potential resolution.

Glass coating insulation can be overcoated with metal to emulate coax geometries for ultrahigh sensitivity electrical imaging. Finally, the probe with its high cantilever design minimizes cantilever electrical interference.The properties of these electrical probes include:

• Ultrastable solid nanowires with exposed probe tips

• Low contact resistance and full insulation with glass up to the probe tip for high electro-potential resolution

• Glass coating insulation which can be overcoated with metal to emulate coax geometries for ultrahigh sensitivity electrical imaging.

• High cantilever design that minimizes cantilever electrical interference

   
Nanonics’ glass insulated nanowire probe for variety of electrical measurements, normal force sensing and multiprobe operation.
Thursday, 28 February 2013 09:12

Dual Probe Optical Measurements

Dual Probe Optical Measurements



 

With two cantilevered, near-field optical probes with exposed tips, optical pump/probe experiments can now be performed. In this example light is injected through one probe and is guided through the sample which is a fiber. With the second probe in place, this injected light can be collected and analyzed both spatially and temporally.A diagramatic illustration is displayed above with a bright field optical microscopic image shown to the left. In this image two NSOM probes are seen in AFM contact with the input and output of the fiber waveguide. In the dark field image, the injected light from the illuminating 100nm near-field optical probe on the right is seen as a small spot of reflected light from the waveguide. This injected light is then guided through the fiber, and the intense spot on the left in the dark field image is collected and analyzed, both spatially and temporally, at the output of the waveguide with a second probe whose silhouette is clearly seen.

 

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